Guest Post: How can messy and disordered processes produce complexity and life?

ultra-scan-of-SupraPolak
© Suprapolak, freeimages.com

How are babies made in the womb? From a sperm cell and an egg cell, an embryo is formed, which then becomes a fetus, and ultimately a baby. Different cell types for bones, skin, muscles, blood, and brain are just a small part of the complexity of human life. Unimaginable numbers of proteins, nucleic acids, and lipids (fats) of just the right kinds are also precisely located in exactly the right locations. Without knowing any of these scientific details, the psalmist wrote, “Thank you for making me so wonderfully complex! Your workmanship is marvelous—how well I know it. You watched me as I was being formed in utter seclusion, as I was woven together in the dark of the womb” (Psalm 139:14-15, New Living Translation). In a certain sense, God makes each baby; in another sense, the baby makes itself—with help from the mother and father, of course! Continue reading

Book Preview: Jesus, Beginnings, and Science

sunrise-in-durbs-1560729 Jacqueline Maurice freeimages
© Jacqueline Maurice, freeimages

Many people consider only Genesis 1–2 when they think about the Bible and creation. While the creation accounts in Genesis 1 and Genesis 2 are certainly important, they represent a small portion of the biblical message of creation For example, there are a multitude of descriptions of creation in Psalms 8, 19, 33, 74, 104, and 148. God’s dialogue with Job is especially rich in this regard, In fact, in his book Faith & Wisdom in Science, Christian physicist Tom McLeish proclaims Job 38–41 to be the most insightful biblical text on creation and science.

Biblical scholar William P Brown also urges us to look beyond Genesis In The Seven Pillars of Creation, Brown examines seven traditions or ways of creation in Continue reading

What does Christ have to do with Chemistry?

Cyclostreptin, of the molecules David has made
Cyclostreptin, one of the molecules David has made. © David Vosburg

David Vosburg is associate professor of Chemistry at Harvey Mudd College, Claremont, California. Here he writes about how his faith enhances, and is enhanced by his science.

A friend once asked me, “What does Christ have to do with chemistry?” He was challenging me to see how my faith might inform my plans to pursue a PhD in chemistry, and also how my understanding of chemistry might enrich my faith. I did not have a ready answer for him, so the question lingered in my thoughts for several years.

My answer developed over the following years, through Continue reading