Guest Post: Conservation as Discipleship

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David Mark, Pixabay

My journey as a Christian and conservationist has honestly been just that – a journey. My first conservation job saw me heading out into the tropical waters of the Maldives to lead a marine conservation programme for a year. Here I faced one of the most rewarding, beautiful years of my life – and also one of the toughest.

Being embedded within a community as a marine biologist, you are faced with a reality so multidimensional that textbook knowledge really only takes you part of the way. The work is constant, conditions are challenging, and the community can feel quite hard to reach. Safe to say, engaging with humanity knocked me for six. The human dimension is arguably the most important aspect of conservation work, and I was unprepared for the types of questions and considerations this work would raise. Continue reading

Summer Special: Why care about conservation?

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Sami M’Rad, Pixabay

All of us are motivated by something. It might be a desire to succeed, please others, follow a particular ethical framework, or perhaps live in the light of faith. Our motivations underpin what we choose to do with our lives; the causes we care about, the career path we pursue and the relationships we nurture. Such is the case for Dr Darren Evans from Newcastle University, who gave an inspiring talk on Christian motivations for biodiversity conservation at the Faraday Summer School in July 2019. Growing up on a housing estate, Darren was inspired to love nature by watching sparrows nest above his bedroom window and by feeding pigeons! Coupled with becoming a Christian at university, this led him to pursue a career as a conservation biologist. Continue reading

Thoughts on Discipleship from a Marine Conservationist

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Cara Daneel. Naifaru, Maldives

When I left university, I was a budding conservationist armed with good intentions, theoretical head knowledge, and an enthusiasm to change the world. I then entered a real world where human hearts were not so easy to sway. After firsthand experience in a variety of contexts, I was left wondering how to negotiate that space between understanding facts and inspiring a sacrificial love which is powerful enough to change our ways. It is not a simple step, but our Christian faith can help this conversation, and possibly the whole planet, in a big way.

My introduction to practical marine conservation began in the tropical waters around Madagascar and the Maldives. Here…

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Become Inspired, Leave Empowered #EarthOptimism

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Cropped from BLM 2016 Making a Difference National Volunteer Awards. By Bureau of Land Management. Flickr. (CC BY 2.0)

Is it sometimes ok to dance in the midst of mourning? Is there time to laugh, or only to weep?[1]

On Earth Day 2017 I joined a worldwide celebration of a concept not usually featured in conservation news: hope. ‘Surely this is no time for celebration?’, you may Continue reading

Guest Post – Stranded: Life and death in the ocean

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Images © Ackroyd & Harvey

Do you go to an art exhibition to be soothed and delighted, or challenged and disturbed? Science uses highly creative approaches to investigate the natural world, but art can perhaps offer a deeper, more personal engagement. Continue reading

Interview: Communicating science and faith in schools

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© Stephanie Bryant

One of the main issues for conservation is communication. How can scientists share their knowledge with the people whose behaviour is affecting the land? This is one of the questions that drew zoologist Stephanie Bryant into Continue reading

Conservation with a purpose

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© Steph Bryant

Could a Biblical understanding of our relationship with nature be the key to effective and purposeful conservation? As part of this current series of guest posts, Steph Bryant, coordinator of the God and the Big Bang project, writes about the relationship between human beings and the planet. She considers the damage we have done, and whether there is any place for hope as we explore ways to remedy the situation and better care for the world around us.

For as long as I can remember I’ve been enthralled by animals. This fascination has steadily grown into a love for scientific knowledge, which helps me to understand the natural world. It was of very little surprise to anyone who knew me that I found myself studying Natural Sciences at the University of Cambridge, specialising in zoology and focussing my final year studies on ecology and conservation science. For me, an appreciation of the natural world leads naturally Continue reading