Guest Post: A wonderful, humbling, vocation

Zebrabow
Zebrafish spinal cord © Tom Hiscock

My day-to-day work as a research scientist involves looking down microscopes at developing organisms, reading papers about the latest discoveries in developmental biology and meeting colleagues and collaborators to discuss new ideas. It is a job that I love!

It is also a job that I find closely aligned with my values and vocation as a Christian. However, this is a more of a general feeling that I have, rather than something that I have thought about directly. Indeed, although I sense that my scientific and faith journeys are somehow intertwined, they rarely overlap directly. Continue reading

Book Preview – The Poetry of Music and Science: Comparing creativity in science and art

music fractal-1746837_1920 Garik Barseghyan Pixabay crop
Garik Barseghyan, Pixabay

I have an intense memory of my first lengthy conversation with an artist (also a professor of fine art at my then home university of Leeds) about our respective experiences of bringing to light new work in art and in science. He spoke of his first experimental attempts to realize an original conception, of the confrontation of his ideas with the felt constraints of material—of paint and photographic print, of the necessary reformulation of the original concept, of the repeat of these frustrated assays not once but many times. I found that I could tell the story of almost any programme of scientific research I had experienced in almost precisely the same terms. Continue reading

Guest Post: Character Strengths – a Biblical perspective from Psychology

acorn-3632517_1920S Hermann and F Richter pixabay
S Hermann and F Richter, Pixabay

Character is something we are all fascinated by. Whether it’s the Myers-Briggs test or the currently popular enneagrams, we’re always looking for ways to understand ourselves and others better. In positive psychology, we have a taxonomy of 24 character strengths, such as curiosity, kindness and persistence. I have the absolute joy of researching a field where my faith and science happily intertwine.

These character strengths really embrace the uniqueness of each individual and give Christians a beautiful language to encourage each other and to embrace our identity in Christ. Psychology can act as an active tool in practically developing character strengths. Today, I’d like to offer you some practical ways of developing 8 specific character strengths. Continue reading

Book Preview: Rosalind Picard – Thinking technology, Thinking Faith

anatomy-1751201_640 Pixabay Gordon Johnson
Gordon Johnson, Pixabay

One place where my faith has helped me with my science is that it has made me fearless. I take it literally when the Bible says ‘Fear only God.’ I’m not going to fear what all my colleagues are going to think of me. Before God all of the most intimidating professors really aren’t intimidating at all. With this perspective all fear of people vanishes. As a child I was quite nervous in front of people, detested public speaking and would weasel out of any public appearance, especially the weekly show-and-tell time at school. I would hide the object my Mom made me bring so I wouldn’t have to stand up in front of class and talk. I would have cowered in the presence of the Nobel prize-winners, CEOs, rock stars, You Tube luminaries, heads of state and other people that I have the pleasure to meet regularly these days. What brought about this change in me? Continue reading

Book Preview: Science and Humanity – reconfiguring the public understanding of science

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Pixabay

It is time to shake off a widely believed but mistaken idea of what science is and how it interacts with human life in the round.

For a long time now it has been the habit of science writers to present their discipline as if it was the be-all and end-all of knowledge, and everything else follows in its wake. Particle physicists have written about their forthcoming ‘theory of everything’ as if it amounted to the final word on the nature of reality, the very ‘mind of God’…The same fundamental error is promoted by neuroscientists who, waxing lyrical over wonderful magnetic images of the living human brain, have declared or implied that all the functioning of the brain is about to be laid open, with no input from the arts and humanities required.  Continue reading

Book Preview: Creation, Providence, and Evolution

Crayfish
© RM Bancewicz

The Christian doctrine of creation has done much to shape the biological sciences that we study today…John Ray (1627– 1705), [was] a key Christian founder of the discipline of natural history that later came to be called biology…Ray taught some of the materials that later became his book [The Wisdom of God manifested in the Works of Creation] not in a lecture hall but in Trinity College chapel because he saw teaching science as an act of worship. John Ray declared that he had published his Ornithology for “the illustration of Gods glory, by exciting men to take notice of, and admire his infinite power and wisdom.”… Continue reading

Guest Post: Seeking the Mind of God

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The Lovell Telescope at Jodrell Bank, by Richard Marriott, Pixabay

God found me very late in life. I had walked out of church at the age of 14, because it didn’t make sense. We arrived back from Kenya in time for me to join the local school for O-levels, and I became committed to studying science from then on. I read Natural Sciences (Physics) at Cambridge, then came to Jodrell Bank (University of Manchester) to do my PhD in Radio Astronomy. I not only found a PhD, but also a husband at Jodrell, and went with him to Caltech when he got a postdoctoral position there.

After some visa negotiations, Caltech also found funding for me, and I started doing optical astronomy with the big telescopes at Palomar. When we returned to the UK 3 years later, I obtained more funding to work on computational astrophysics, building n-body models of galaxies to see how the stars moved to make up the shapes we see. Continue reading