Re-Joining the Choir: Why people are the helpers, not priests, of creation

IMG_5448
© Ruth M. Bancewicz

One of the main ideas on this blog over the last couple of years has been the concept that all creation praises God. This is a recurring theme in the Bible, and so is the idea that we join in with creation’s praise when we worship God ourselves. The theologian Richard Bauckham, who is best known for his book Jesus and the Eyewitnesses, has been an important voice on this subject. A kind friend sent me one of his articles recently, and I wanted to share some of the highlights from it here. Continue reading

Book Preview: Jesus, Beginnings, and Science

sunrise-in-durbs-1560729 Jacqueline Maurice freeimages
© Jacqueline Maurice, freeimages

Many people consider only Genesis 1–2 when they think about the Bible and creation. While the creation accounts in Genesis 1 and Genesis 2 are certainly important, they represent a small portion of the biblical message of creation For example, there are a multitude of descriptions of creation in Psalms 8, 19, 33, 74, 104, and 148. God’s dialogue with Job is especially rich in this regard, In fact, in his book Faith & Wisdom in Science, Christian physicist Tom McLeish proclaims Job 38–41 to be the most insightful biblical text on creation and science.

Biblical scholar William P Brown also urges us to look beyond Genesis In The Seven Pillars of Creation, Brown examines seven traditions or ways of creation in Continue reading

Finding our Place in the World: Belonging, Limits, and Abundance

Picture2 by Lauren Stark Adams of Spokane, Washington
© Lauren Stark Adams of Spokane, Washington

What is our place in the world? In his seminar at the Faraday Institute last month, Dr Jonathan Moo described the current movement towards ecomodernism, which involves a separation from nature. If you want to understand this trend in more depth you can listen to the recording of Jonathan’s talk. In this post I will focus on the last part of the seminar, where Jonathan presented his own ideas about how limits can help us to flourish. Continue reading

What does the Bible actually say about Adam and Eve?

Lucas_Cranach_(I)_-_Adam_and_Eve-Paradise_-_Kunsthistorisches_Museum-crop

Professor J. Richard Middleton feels called to help the church interpret the Bible well (see last week’s podcast). In his seminar at the Faraday Institute last month, he outlined what he thinks the first two chapters of Genesis say about the origin of humankind.

In ancient Hebrew, the words that are often translated into the names Adam and Eve can have more than one meaning. They can be personal names, or they can mean Continue reading

Evolved in the image of God?

Creación_de_Adán_(Miguel_Ángel)
by Michelangelo [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
How could an evolved species be made ‘in the image of God’? This was just one of the questions tackled by J. Richard Middleton, Professor at Northeastern seminary in New York State, in his Faraday seminar a few weeks ago. I will cover the seminar next week, but for this podcast (abbreviated transcript below) I wanted to get to know him a bit more, and find out what he – as an evangelical biblical scholar – thinks about this particular question. Continue reading

Become Inspired, Leave Empowered #EarthOptimism

27405775582_227466a898_o-crop
Cropped from BLM 2016 Making a Difference National Volunteer Awards. By Bureau of Land Management. Flickr. (CC BY 2.0)

Is it sometimes ok to dance in the midst of mourning? Is there time to laugh, or only to weep?[1]

On Earth Day 2017 I joined a worldwide celebration of a concept not usually featured in conservation news: hope. ‘Surely this is no time for celebration?’, you may Continue reading

What Animals Teach Christians about Getting Along

Portuguese_Man_o'_War_at_Palm_Beach_FL_by_Volkan_Yuksel_DSC05878
Portuguese Man o’ War By Volkan Yuksel (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

The deadly marine wonder, the Portuguese man o’ war, resembles a jellyfish with its beautiful blue and purple ship-shaped bladder and impressive 30-foot stinging tentacles. What may at first appear to be a single organism is actually a colony of four completely different types of polyp, working together so closely that they are not able to survive Continue reading