Science and Belief

Archive for the ‘worship’ Category

Breathe

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Adam Ciesielski, freeimages.com

© Adam Ciesielski, freeimages.com

Every time you breathe, a series of air pockets with a combined surface area the size of a tennis court is bathed with oxygen. In your lungs, the boundary between air and blood is so thin that oxygen and carbon dioxide can diffuse freely from one to the other. So every time your heart beats, the blood rushing around your body is refreshed with enough new oxygen to keep you alive.

A while ago I commented on the lack of current science in Christian worship music, but the very next month a song was released that at least hinted that we know enough about the working of our bodies to show us something amazing about God.

You show your majesty

In every star that shines,

And every time we breathe
.

Your glory, God revealed

From distant galaxies

To here beneath our skin.

excerpt from Magnificent (Kingsway, 2011)

Matt Redman, who co-wrote th song with Jonas Myrin, is an astronomy geek Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Ruth Bancewicz

October 2, 2014 at 10:00 am

Humility

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Martin Walls, http://www.freeimages.com

© Martin Walls, http://www.freeimages.com

A few years ago I paid a visit to the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History‘s Human Origins exhibition. Our tour guide was Rick Potts, director of the Human Origins Program and curator of anthropology at the Museum. Potts has been involved in activities with BioLogos, and is keen to help Christians understand his research.

The David H. Koch Hall of Human Origins follows the history of humankind, starting with creatures that were just beginning to walk upright, and moving right through to the present day. We were shown the development of tools, different types of food, social activities and symbolism. It was fascinating to explore the artifacts and reconstructions of the digs where they had been found, but I also found the experience very moving. Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Ruth Bancewicz

August 14, 2014 at 10:00 am

Churches Celebrating Science

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St John’s Church, Waterbeach, © Trevor Thorn

We have held a science-themed session for the children in my church a couple of times, but what about something for everyone? A church leader in Cambridgeshire recently contacted me because he was about to run a science and faith weekend in his parish, and I thought it was such a great idea that I wanted to spread the word.

Trevor Thorn, a fundraising professional and lay minister for two country churches, has always had a passion for both science and creativity. When he suggested a science-themed weekend at All Saints’ Landbeach and St John’s Waterbeach, he received such an overwhelmingly positive response that he decided to give it a go. The person in charge of the childrens’ work happened to be a mathematician who shared his interest in science, and another member of the congregation was also a lab technician. Together they planned a series of activities that would show how science Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Ruth Bancewicz

June 5, 2014 at 10:00 am

The New Psalmists

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croatian monastery 2 cropped

Croatian cloister © Ruth Bancewicz

For Christians, science can enhance our worship, both individual and collective. CS Lewis wrote that worship completes our enjoyment of something,[i] and enjoyment of creation has always played a part in fostering worship. Monasteries and retreat houses often include open spaces or gardens where people can draw near to God through being surrounded by nature, and church buildings and cathedrals often contain natural motifs. The Psalms are very early examples of worship songs that express joy at the glory of creation. In other parts of the Bible the immensity and grandeur of creation is also used to invoke a feeling of awe and worship. Perhaps the most powerful expression of this is found in the book of Job. In the last few chapters, God describes the great sweep of his works in nature. We now understand some parts of the processes described – the formation of Earth, weather and animal behaviour, for example – but the whole is just as awesome as it was thousands of years ago. ‘And these are but the outer fringe of his works; how faint the whisper we hear of him! Who then can understand the thunder of his power?’ (Job 26:14) Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Ruth Bancewicz

May 30, 2013 at 10:00 am

Life in a Bountiful Universe

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Omega Centauri star cluster cropped

Omega centauri star cluster, Hubblesite.org, NASA

The astronomer Dr Jennifer Wiseman visited Cambridge recently to speak about her work on ‘exoplanet’ discovery. Exoplanets are planets in solar systems other than our own, and until 1989 they were the stuff of science fiction. Now we know there definitely are other planets in the universe, some of which may be like Earth. The discovery of life on other planets – perhaps single celled organisms – in the next few decades is a real possibility. Our universe is active and fruitful. We live in an abundant universe, and can celebrate that with new knowledge. The changes made to the Hubble telescope in 2009 have brought us beautiful new pictures that show the universe in greater depth than ever before. This one of the Omega Centauri star cluster shows a startling variety of stars. The universe is beautiful, and the range of telescopes that astronomers use are like a symphony orchestra, with many different instruments contributing to our knowledge of the universe. Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Ruth Bancewicz

May 9, 2013 at 10:00 am

Soli Deo Gloria

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Michael & Christa Richert, http://www.sxc.hu/

© Michael & Christa Richert, http://www.sxc.hu/

For most Christians working in science, their work helps them to worship. The theologian Alister McGrath has written a number of books about the relationship between science and Christianity, but he also stresses that our response to what we see in science should not simply be intellectual. A Christian view of nature should recognise the intuitive sense of awe and wonder that we have when we look at the natural world, and our increased awe as our scientific understanding grows.[1] Our response to those feelings is rational, emotional and active: worship as well as theology.[2] How does a scientist worship? In her writing on wonder, the philosopher and cognitive scientist Margaret Boden captures the experience of a Christian scientist when she says that ‘awe is a high degree of wonder, in which fear and respect are prominent. And worship is a deliberate expression of awe’.[3] Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Ruth Bancewicz

April 18, 2013 at 10:00 am

Faraday

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Michael Faraday. Wellcome Images (cropped), Creative Commons License 4

Michael Faraday. From Wellcome Image Library (cropped), Creative Commons License 4

Michael Faraday would no doubt be acutely embarrassed if he had lived to see an Institute named after him. He was one of the greatest experimental scientists of all time but he also gave himself to public education, shunned wealth and fame, and belonged to a small Christian denomination called the ‘Sandemanians’. This week at the Faraday Institute we hosted the chemist and former director of the Royal Institution, Sir John Meurig Thomas, who spoke about the Genius of Michael Faraday.

Michael Faraday (1791-1867) was the son of a blacksmith. He received a very basic education as a child, and was apprenticed to a bookbinder at the age of 14. Faraday was extremely bright, and finding himself surrounded by books, decided to educate himself – inspired by Isaac Watts’ ‘Improvement of the Mind’. A customer noticed his intelligence and gave him tickets to a series of lectures by the great chemist Humphrey Davy.

In the early nineteenth century the chemical revolution was in full swing. Successful experimentalists like Davy were celebrated figures, and drew huge audiences. Faraday was gripped. He wrote up his notes from the lectures – three hundred pages including illustrations – and sent a bound copy to Davy, asking for a job. Davy was so impressed by Faraday’s work that he employed him as a secretary, and found him a job at the Royal Institution the following year. Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Ruth Bancewicz

November 22, 2012 at 10:57 am

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