H is for Hawk

© Rose Meyer, freeimages.com
© Rose Meyer, freeimages.com

Do we struggle, or snuggle for existence? This is a question that Martin Nowak, Harvard’s Professor of Mathematical Biology addresses in his book SuperCooperators, and it is also played out in H is for Hawk, the Cambridge writer Helen Macdonald’s beautiful account of her relationship with a goshawk.

Macdonald had developed an interest in falconry as a child Continue reading

Guest Post: Living and working at the Beautiful, Blue Frontlines of Marine Conservation

A sunset from our island in the Maldives. © Cara Daneel
A sunset from our island in the Maldives. © Cara Daneel

Conservation work falls at the interface between pure biological study and the philosophies, politics, needs, attitudes and general realm of human beings. This meeting point is something that has attracted me ever since I was introduced to fisheries science at the University of Cape Town in South Africa. Continue reading

In the Eye of the Barracuda: Beauty in the Ocean

© free images – enbrut Dani
© free images – enbrut Dani

The oceans are the least explored place in the world. They are a source of great beauty and value to ourselves as a source of food, water and so many other ‘ecosystem services’, as well as having their own intrinsic value.  Marine conservationist Bob Sluka has featured on this blog a number of times, and in this month’s podcast he shares his appreciation of the beauty of the oceans, and how that relates to his faith. Continue reading

Guest Post: Wonders of the Cell

Leaf cross-section © K Szkurlatowski, freeimages.com
Leaf cross-section © K Szkurlatowski, freeimages.com

Most scientists get excited when talking about science in general.  But they get really animated when talking about their own area of research. I spent my PhD years studying microtubules, which are microscopic filaments inside living cells, and even now I get a little misty-eyed when thinking about them.  To some people, microtubules might not be beautiful – in some images they look rather like a writhing hairball or bowl of spaghetti – but Continue reading

Life in the Lab: Experiments, Beauty, and Making Sense of the World

The most fun part of life in the lab is doing experiments, because only then do you get to find out new things. In today’s videos, neurobiologist Harvey McMahon explains what he enjoys most about scientific research, and how his faith and work affect each other.

For more, read God in the Lab: How Science Enhances Faith (Monarch, 2015).

Continue reading

Jennifer Siggers: The Science I Love, and How it Points to God

© Krishnan Gopakumar, freeimages.com
© Krishnan Gopakumar, freeimages.com

Einstein wondered why is it that we can make sense of the universe. This is a question that today’s guest author, Jennifer Siggers, has also asked. Jennifer is a mathematician based at Imperial College London who applies her skills to Continue reading

Teaching the Beauty of Biology: Jeff Hardin

Belief in God can lead to a greater appreciation for science. This is the experience of Jeff Hardin, author of this week’s guest post. In today’s podcast he shares how for him, scientific discovery leads to worship. He also speaks about the work of Abraham Kuyper, and C.S. Lewis’s idea of ‘patches of Godlight’.

To find out more about Jeff’s work and faith, and the importance of beauty in both science and Christianity, see God in the Lab: How Science Enhances Faith (Monarch, 2015).